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Wednesday, October 21, 2020 | History

3 edition of Tensile creep and stress-rupture behavior of polymer derived SiC fibers found in the catalog.

Tensile creep and stress-rupture behavior of polymer derived SiC fibers

Tensile creep and stress-rupture behavior of polymer derived SiC fibers

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  • 12 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in [Washington, DC], [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ceramic fibers.,
  • Creep rupture strength.,
  • Creep strength.,
  • Creep tests.,
  • Load tests.,
  • Silicon carbides.,
  • Tensile creep.,
  • Tensile tests.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementH.M. Yun, J.C. Goldbsy and J.A. DiCarlo.
    SeriesNASA technical memorandum -- 106692.
    ContributionsGoldsby, Jon C., DiCarlo, James A., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15403316M

    Monotonic, Creep-Rupture, and Fatigue Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) at an Elevated Temperature [John M. Engesser] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Monotonic, Creep-Rupture, and Fatigue Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) at an Elevated Temperature. Three different CVD SiC fibers were tested for bend stress relaxation (BSR) and tensile creep over a wide range of temperatures, times, and stresses. Primary creep was always observed, even for creep strains on the order of 2%. The BSR and tensile creep results were compared using simple linear viscoelastic principles.

      Tensile Creep Behavior of In‐Situ Single Crystal Oxide Ceramics Eutectic Composites in Ultra‐High Temperature, High Pressure . Book Series: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Creep and Stress‐Rupture Behavior of Hi‐Nicalon Sic Fibers (Pages: ) of Particulate Additions on the Rheological Properties of Polymer Based Slurry Mixtures and the Characteristics of Polymer Based Slurry Derived Preforms (Pages.

    Microstructure and High Temperature Mechanical Behavior of New Polymer Derived SiC Based Fibers. Maric‐Hélène Berger. Centre des Matériaux, Ecole des Mines de Paris, BP 87 Evry Cedex, France Book Editor(s): Don Bray. Search for more papers by this author which influence their sizes as well as the tensile and creep behaviour Cited by: The intent is to show the close relationship between process, structure and properties for ceramic fibers which have been derived from polymers (Figure ). Keywords Polymer Precursor Ceramic Fiber Critical Flaw Silicon Carbonitride Silicon Carbide FiberCited by: 5.


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Tensile creep and stress-rupture behavior of polymer derived SiC fibers Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fibers also showed excellent strength retention after annealing heat treatments up to °C for the carbon‐rich fibers and up to °C for the near‐stoichiometric fibers. The near‐stoichiometric fibers could be prepared with ∼ 3 GPa tensile strength and BSR creep behavior which was significantly better than previously reported for other types of polymer‐derived SiC‐ based : Michael D.

Sacks, Greg A. Staab. Abstract. Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on polymer derived Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and SiC/BN-coated Nicalon SiC fibers. Test conditions were temperatures from to C, stresses from to MPa, stress application times up to hours, and air, argon, and vacuum test : H.

Yun, J. Dicarlo and J. Goldsby. Polymer-derived SiC-based fibers with fine-diameter (∼ 10–15 μm) and high strength (∼ 3 GPa) were prepared with carbon-rich and near-stoichiometric compositions.

The creep resistance of these fibers (as assessed by bend stress relaxation, BSR, measurements) could be improved significantly by. The creep behavior of Hi-Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon S, and Tyranno SA3 fibers is investigated at temperatures up to °C. Tensile tests were carried out on a high-capability fiber testing apparatus in which the fiber is heated uniformly under vacuum.

Analysis of initial microstructure and composition of fibers was performed using various techniques. The tensile creep behavior of a SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC composite has been investigated in argon at temperatures of –°C.

The apparent stress exponents for creep of the composite and the apparent activation energies for creep increase with decrease in stress. The threshold stress approach can be used to treat the by: The tensile creep and rupture behavior of 2D-woven SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites with potential for advanced high temperature structural applications was determined in air at  °C.

The results are compared to similar SiC/SiC data in the literature in order to understand the underlying creep and rupture by: polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning.

Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temper-Cited by: Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning.

Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi. Fig. 2 shows average room temperature tensile strengths and apparent crystallite sizes for three types of fibers after heat treatment in Ar for 1 h at temperatures in the range of – °C.

The grain growth has a significant effect on the strength of SiC-based by: Typical Tensile Creep Behavior of the Near-Stoichiometric CVD-derived Ultra SCS Monofilament SiC Fiber •Unlike the polymer-derived SiC fibers with ~ equiaxed grains, the CVD-derived Ultra fiber only displays a primary (transient) stage with t1/3 and linear stress dependences.

This is probably related to the elongated transverse grains in theseFile Size: KB. and shows linear stress dependency. A behavior similar to CVD-derived ultra SCS monofilament SiC fiber and CVD SiC matrix. •The creep strain can be represented by the equation: ε p (%) =(C)[ m] [ t x exp (-B/T)]1/3 where m is the stress in CMC matrix, T is temperature, B is a constant, and t is time.

TheFile Size: 1MB. Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at and °C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers. In order to further expand the application of SiC/SiC composites in the hot-end components for advanced aerospace engines, a self-healing SiC/(SiC-SiBCN)x composite prepared by CVI + PIOP has been tested for their creep behavior at °C with the partial pressure of 12 kPa H 2 O: 8 kPa O 2: 80 kPa the samples tested under low stresses, the load is borne by a.

Summary Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types ofpolymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, andSylramic from Dow Corning.

Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recentdevelopmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. H.M. Yun, J.C.

Goldsby, and J.A. DiCarlo, Tensile creep and stress-rupture behavior of polymer derived SiC fibers, to be published in: “Advances in Ceramic Matrix Composi Ceramic Transactions ()”; also NASA TM (). Google ScholarAuthor: James A.

DiCarlo, Hee Mann Yun. Abstract. Understanding the thermomechanical behavior (creep and stress relaxation) of ceramic fibers is of both practical and basic interest. On the practical level, ceramic fibers are the reinforcement for ceramic matrix composites which are being developed for use in high temperature by: 5.

Get this from a library. Tensile creep and stress-rupture behavior of polymer derived SiC fibers. [Hee Mann Yun; Jon C Goldsby; James A DiCarlo; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.]. J.A. DiCarlo and H-M. Yun, “Creep and Stress Rupture Behavior of Advanced SiC Fibers,” Proceedings of ICCM, vol.

VI (Cambridge, England: Woodhead Publishing Limited, ), – Google ScholarCited by: Tensile Creep and Creep-Recovery Behavior of a S i C- F i be r-Si N,-Mat r i x Corn posi te John W. Holmes,*.' Yong H. Park,' and J. Wayne JonesC Ceramic Composites Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Liniversity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48.

Summary Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types ofpolymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, andSylramic from Dow Corning.In order to relate single fiber behavior to multiple fiber behavior in composites, fast-fracture tensile strength, creep, and stress-rupture studies were conducted on advanced SiC fiber multifilament tows in the temperature range from 20 to C in air as well as in inert environments.

For conditions of small fiber creep (short times and low temperatures), the tow .22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings. Editors(s): Don Bray; First published: 26 March Polymer‐Derived SiC‐Based Fibers with High Tensile Strength and Improved Creep Resistance ( Compressive Creep Behavior of SiC Fiber‐Reinforced.